Harraq Osbao

This simple dish has plenty of distinct flavors. It’s a delicate fusion of rich, creamy flavors paired with the light, fresh crunch of the pomegranate. It’s a comforting and hearty meal and, thanks to all the colorful garnishes, it is a meal “fit for the king”.

The name literally translates from Arabic as “he burnt his finger”, which goes some way to explaining how popular it is with the diners, as they famously burn their fingers in the eagerness to eat it.

To continue reading please click the link below

Harraq Osbao

Advertisements

2 Comments Add yours

  1. S Butt says:

    Pomegranate not too long ago became popular in this country but of course has been around a long time.

    I recall as we were growing up we eaten it mainly as fruit in its raw state, juice or to make chutney but these days chef across the country use pomegranates widely in variety of dishes.

    I remember watching reputable cookery show bemused by judges unjustified criticism on chef for mixing pomegranate with salad. How things have changed, recently I’ve seen soups served with pomegranate on top because they looks so beautiful chef explained. Another cookery show, I watched tv chef made cous cous with pomegranate. It was soothing like your dish.

    What kind of pome required sweet or sharp for this dish?. I’ve never tried it before so wouldn’t know what it should taste like when it’s done.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. So true. The sweet one will taste lovely it will balance the tang from the tamarind in the daal. It gives a very fresh taste to the whole thing.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s